Wetlands- Chesapeake Bay

Abiotic Factors
The flocculation of salt is ever-changing and is effected by changing seasons, weather patterns, water currents and temperatures from summer to winter. If the Chesapeake bay goes away then animals and plants that have adapted to the salt concentration and can’t live anywhere else will go extinct. Invasive species are a problem. Food, water and filter runoff water.

Biotic Factors
More than sixteen different species of underwater grasses exist. Underwater vegetation is also called “SAV”. Bay grasses are an excellent measure of the bays overall measure of the bays health because it is not under harvest pressure. Underwater vegetation is a great source of food for plankton, fish, shellfish and water fowl. Blue crabs hide among the grasses after they have molted (there shell comes off) which makes them vulnerable to predators. Other fish and small crustaceans linger among the grasses too. The bay grasses also serve as a nursery. Scientists found 30 times more young crabs than anywhere else in the area. Barnacles, sea slugs, sponges, and sea squirts can also be found. Many of these crustaceans are a valuable food source to migrating and resident waterfowl. Zooplankton feed on dead sea grass and they are also a food source for smaller fish. All under water plants undergo photosynthesis and release air into the water for the other organisms to breath. Salinity is the main factor of where bay grasses grow. Eelgrass and widgeon grass prefer high salinity levels. Redhead grass and sago pondweed grow in fresh “blackish” water. Just like plants on land; the plants need sunlight to grow, so plants to low can’t grow. Over the recent decades storm runoff has polluted the bay with unwanted nutrients that is threatening the plants and animals. But the plants respond fairly quickly and help the water get clean and improve the bays overall health. Photosynthesis is a huge part of the wetlands of Chesapeake. If there is too much algae in the wetlands means that there will be too much nitrogen in the water and may cause some organisms to die.
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Threats
If there is too much algae in the wetlands means that there will be too much nitrogen in the water and may cause some organisms to die. The flocculation of salt is ever-changing and is effected by changing seasons, weather patterns, water currents and temperatures from summer to winter. If the Chesapeake Bay goes away then animals and plants that have adapted to the salt concentration and can’t live anywhere else will go extinct. Invasive species are a problem. Food, water and filter for runoff water.

Importance
If the wetland go away then there will be many animals without homes and water.

Conservation Plan
We all can help save he wetlands! All we have to do is stop polluting the water and stop the increasing amount of buildings and people that are invading wetlands in some areas.


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