Animals

Axis deer (Herbivore)-
· Not native to Hawaii
· 95-225 lbs
· Today hunte9d on Molokai, Lanai, Maui
· Eats crops, grasses, shrubs, and native species
Mongoose-
· Length is 18” to 26”
· Eats birds, eggs, Insects, fruit & berries
· Introduced to Hawaii from India to control rats
· It is native to Hawaii
‘Oma‘o
· Native to Hawaii
· 7 inches long
· East fruits, berries, and insects
· The canopy, sub canopy, and understory for a habitat
· Not endangered species
Pua‘a (Wild pig)-
· Weigh from 150 lbs. to more than 400lbs.
· Favorite food is earth worms
· Also eats snails, shrubs, and stems
· Not native to Hawaii
Mosquito-Larvae eat minute plants in the water
· Adult males eat plant juicy and females drink blood
· It is not native to Hawaii
· Biotic Factors
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· *Activity adapted with permission from The 2001 Arbor Day National
· Poster Contest Activity Guide
· The Nature Conservancy Oahu Program - Project Stewardship
· (forest layers diagram)
· Mari Sakamoto (Native Hawaiian plant drawings)
· Rainforests: reaches 30 feet or higher (more than 10 meters).
· Plants:
· ‘Ohi’a lehua:, found in dry, wet, and mesic forests. Produce large amount of nectar.
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Mamane is native to Hawaii and is found in dry and mesic forests.
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Naio tree, found in dry, wet, and rain forests.
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‘Ohelo la’au (shrub), found in mesic and rain forests
· Koa (tree), native to Hawaii and is found in mesic, dry and rain forests.
· strawberry guavais not native to Hawaii and is found in dry, mesic, and rain forests
Notes on Threats
§ The Coqui tree frog is driving people out of their house’s because of the loud chirp.
§ They where invading Hawaii in 1992, and then they made their way to Maui, Oahu, Kauai, & Hawaii’s main island.
§ The Coqui frog was accidently imported to Hawaii hidden on plants
§ The Coqui frog’s diet is mostly insects that could be devastating to Hawaii.
§ To discourage the frogs they removed ground leaves and any debris that holds moisture, trim vines and cut dead leaves, & drain any container that can catch any rain water.
§ APHIS is working on a way to manage the Coqui population.
§ Because the frogs are eating a lot of insects biologists are worried that native spiders will become extinct and other bugs.
Importance
The Hawaiian Rainforest is important for many different organisms to live. Rainforest didn’t have the right tempter then some of the rainforest plants would not be there because of tempter. And the rainforest provides oxygen for us and if we didn’t have the rainforest we wouldn’t have oxygen. Let alone the rest of the living things in our planet. Like the berries in the rain forest. Without them little birds and other animals wouldn’t be able to eat and so they would die. Anything that would eat the little animals would die to because they wouldn’t have anything to eat. There for making a huge change in the ecosystem. Everything relies on something else to survive, but what would we do if it ran out?
Coqui Tree frog
By: Megan (:, Tristen(:, Destiny(: & Michaela(:
-Description


The Coqui tree frog is living in most of Hawaii. The Coqui keeps doubling all the time, which is now invading Hawaii. Hawaii’s climate is warm all year long. Its main habitat is mesic and the rainforest. The rainforest reaches 30 feet or higher. Some of their plants are the ‘ohi’a lehua, Mamane, Naio tree, & the koa (tree). All these plants are native to Hawaii. The Coqui is the size of a quarter full grown. Its colors are yellow, brown, and green mixed together. The Coqui tree frogs food web includes these animals: the axis deer, the mongoose, many different kinds of birds, a wild pig, & of course the mosquito. Check out the food web! J

Conversation Plan

The biggest problem the people of Hawaii have are the Coqui tree frog over populating and taking the food of other animals. The frogs are eating all the food native animals need to survive. And it doesn’t help that they have an annoying chirp.

The APHIS is an Animal and plant health inspection service that has a way of getting rid of the over populated Coqui Tree frogs. It also agrees that the frogs are getting way too populated and are a big threat to the ecosystem.
APHIS is working on a way to manage the Coqui population.

To discourage the frogs they removed ground leaves and any debris that holds moisture, trim vines and cut dead leaves, & drain any container that can catch any rain water. With a lower population of frogs there will be more food for all native animals and it won’t be as annoying when people go to sleep at night. Some people would like them completely taken out but then others just want the population decreased.
But if getting rid of the frogs means saving the ecosystem then so be it.


Coral_Reef_Food_Web.JPG



Original image: 'A Coqui Frog!'
http://www.flickr.com/photos/60423415@N00/84206411
by: Pat Hooper

Attribution: "Coqui, Puerto Rico"
http://www.flickr.com/photos/55886770@N00/310009994

Attribution: "El Coquí of Puerto Rico"
http://www.flickr.com/photos/10858765@N06/1450675634

Attribution: "Coqui and Eggs"
http://www.flickr.com/photos/80244250@N00/314462460

Attribution: "Traditional Hawaiian Garden"
http://www.flickr.com/photos/20504126@N00/1444969853

Attribution: "Coqui!"
http://www.flickr.com/photos/80244250@N00/297665659

Original image: 'El Coquí of Puerto Rico'
http://www.flickr.com/photos/10858765@N06/1450672092
by: Angel A. Acevedo

*Activity adapted with permission from The 2001 Arbor Day National
Poster Contest Activity Guide
The Nature Conservancy Oahu Program - Project Stewardship(forest layers diagram)

Mari Sakamoto (Native Hawaiian plant drawings)